When you think about cooling a hot building, you probably don’t think of heat pumps. In fact, the words “air conditioner” are likely the first things that come to your head unless you’re tight with your pennies. Then you might go with “window fans.” As it turns out, a heat pump can both heat and cool, and in some applications, it’s preferred to separate heating and cooling systems.

Simply put, a heat pump is a device that uses a small amount of energy to move heat from one location to another. Not too difficult, right? Heat pumps are typically used to pull heat out of the air or ground to heat a home or office building, but they can be reversed to cool a building. In a way, if you know how an air conditioner works, then you already know a lot about how a heat pump works. This is because heat pumps and air conditioners operate in a very similar way.

One of the biggest advantages of a heat pump over a standard heating ventilating and air conditioning(HVAC) unit is that there’s no need to install separate systems to heat and cool your home. Heat pumps also work extremely efficiently, because they simply transfer heat, rather than burn fuel to create it.

For climates with moderate heating and cooling needs, heat pumps offer an energy-efficient alternative to furnaces and air conditioners. Like your refrigerator, heat pumps use electricity to move heat from a cool space to a warm space, making the cool space cooler and the warm space warmer. During the heating season, heat pumps move heat from the cool outdoors into your warm house and during the cooling season, heat pumps move heat from your cool house into the warm outdoors. Because they move heat rather than generate heat, heat pumps can provide up to 4 times the amount of energy they consume.

The most common type of heat pump is the air-source heat pump, which transfers heat between your house and the outside air. If you heat with electricity, a heat pump can trim the amount of electricity you use for heating by as much as 30% to 40%. High-efficiency heat pumps also dehumidify better than standard central air conditioners, resulting in less energy usage and more cooling comfort in summer months.

Typical heat pump systems illustrations:

Buffer Tanks

Buffer tanks are often employed within HVAC systems to provide additional system fluid volume in order to prevent short cycling of heating or cooling apparatus. Hiseeroffer  these tanks in sizes from 100 litres to 2000 litres tank volumes. Each of these tank models are available with system connections on the side of each tank located either high or low to meet application requirements. To meet the wide scope of job site specific connection sizes specified these tanks are available with a standard range of connection sizes as shown on our submittal data sheets.